Dementia

Over the next 30 years, costs to the Canadian economy relating to dementia will approach $900 billion. The number of Canadians with dementia will double. At least.

The effects of dementia are not played out in hospitals. They’re played out in the homes of people who have it.

That’s where you see water gushing from a tap into an abandoned, overflowing bath tub. Front doors left wide open. The oven on with nothing in it.

Estimates claim that one dementia patient directly affects the lives of 12 – 20 people. Add this to the statistic that one in 11 Canadians over the age of 65 is living with dementia, and the true impact of the condition begins to take shape.

Over the next 30 years, costs to the Canadian economy relating to dementia will approach $900 billion. The number of Canadians with dementia will double. At least.

Still, it’s the people who have dementia who pay the stiffest price. Dementia doesn’t kill you. It kills who you are.

By adding the best, high definition 3T scanning equipment, the University Hospital Foundation’s Brain Centre Campaign will equip our outstanding researchers with the most advanced technology they’ll need to:

  • trace cellular activity in the brain in the hopes of determining the cause of erratic behaviour that leads to dementia,
  • communicate seamlessly with fellow dementia researchers
  • participate in related research projects around the world
In supporting research and innovation, our Brain Centre Campaign will ensure that new and ongoing research in the fields of Alzheimer’s Disease, the leading form of dementia, and stroke-induced vascular dementia, will continue.

Such research is currently being conducted by Dr. Jack Jhamandas, a researcher in the division of Neurology at the University of Alberta, who recently discovered that a drug intended for diabetes appears to restore memory in patients with Alzheimer’s. Further testing needs to be completed before talk of clinical trials can begin.

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